March 26th, 2008


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01:36 am - on teens and technology...

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on teens and technology... - graffiti.maverick — LiveJournal

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Comments:


[User Picture]From: suicideking Date: March 26th, 2008 - 01:05 pm (Link)
Do teens need cell phones?

No, they don't "need" them any more than you or I need them. But if they want them and are responsible enough to have them, then I am fine with them(teens) having them (phones).


And if they have cellphones what should be the policy of schools regarding them?

It is a school's directive to maintain an environment of instruction. As long as they don't break the law, they have the right to do whatever is necessary to maintain that for the greater good. I am fine with banning a cell phone from the premises or enforcing a rule that states that you are not allowed to use it during school hours.

And yes, that means being heavy-handed and iron-fisted. Allowing a little wiggle room with it during lunch or between classes (when the rule is pretty clear and unwaivering as written) opens up the door for abusing the rule elsewhere. Thus, as unfair as it is, you have to set the rules and abide by them. If the school decides no phones whatsoever, part of the responsiblities with said phone is to use it under the rules governing the environment that they are in, same as in the workforce or a move theater.


Do you think its bad that kids are communicating virtually so often now?

No. Anything else is techophobic and xenophobic.

Do you think that at 14 or 15 a kid still needs to be "learning to socialize face-to-face?" Or do you feel like I do, that they are trying to apply old rules to a society that no longer works the way they think it does. In my view, it didn't even work that way then. But whatever.

Yes, they absolutely need to learn to socialize face to face. It is an integral part of our society and necessary to achieve anything in this world.

But that is not all that they need to learn. As new forms of communications open, they need to learn to embrace those as well. It doesn't have to happen as school or in a class, but learing the nuances of texting, IMing, emailing, etc., are just as important as phone etiquette, grammar and typing was to learn in earlier generations.

Anyway, how do you feel?

Kinda sleepy and a little queasy.

[User Picture]From: chrismaverick Date: March 27th, 2008 - 05:16 pm (Link)
See, it all depends on your usage of the term "need." I do need a cell phone. I literally can't work without one. It's part of my job. Some would argue that since that's the case, they should provide me with one, but that's not how it works.

And sure, schools will have their rules. That doesn't mean they shouldn't be reviewed however. I'm not saying that the school has to blindly follow everything I say. I'm saying that they should look into the rationales for such rules and evaluate them logically and in modern terms rather than just saying "but that's the rule." I'll grant "no calls during class." Fine. But lunch is different. Nothing is gained by no calls during lunch. Possibly you have an issue with kids being late for class. Fine, punish the late kids. But if I'm late for class because I was busy doing my homework at lunch, that's no more excusable than because I was talking to my girlfriend (on the phone or in person).

When I was in high school, we used to play cards at lunch. And we'd get in trouble for it because "no cards in school." To which my basic response was "fuck you." I am required to sit in a room doing nothing but eating for 30 min. Why can't I enjoy myself while I do so?
 

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